A Little R-E-S-P-E-C-T

Are you familiar with the Aretha Franklin song from 1967, “RESPECT?”  I was 15 years old when it hit the airwaves. I loved that song just as much I loved the artist, the legendary “Queen of Soul.”

It occurs to me that a little respect is what teachers need these days.

I started feeling the slippage of respect for my chosen profession as early as the early 1980’s. Salaries for teachers had already taken a huge hit because of the recession of the 70’s. And in my state, at least, teacher salaries never caught up with the rest of the economy.

Salaries are one way the public displays its lack of respect for teachers. For those who have never taught but think it looks like an easy gig, the salary may even seem inflated. After all, teachers only work “half of the year” which is what one misguided gentleman told me in a Facebook exchange a few days ago. They get their summers off, and they only work 6 hours a day if you only count the face time spent with kids.

But here is the thing that non-teachers don’t understand. You can’t only count the hours spent with kids. A teacher’s duties begin with hours and hours of planning. After the lesson plan has been executed, there are more hours spent in grading and assessing. Then there is more planning to do, not to mention endless meetings and requirements for professional development credit along the way.

respect

Lack of respect from the public is one thing. In recent years, the lack of respect has become more personal. Students disrespect their teachers, and so do their parents.

When I was a child, my father taught me that if I was anywhere where he wasn’t, I was to listen to and respect the adult in charge. If I was on the school bus, that meant I was to listen to and respect the bus driver. If I happened to be at school, that person would be the teacher or the principal. Failing to respect the adult in charge would yield negative consequences.

I always respected my teachers, even when I didn’t always like them. I never talked back…not once. I sometimes disobeyed by talking too much or not paying attention when I should, but if I got caught behaving poorly, I knew better than to complain about it at home. I took my punishment.

It doesn’t work that way anymore. No one respects anyone anymore. We are worse off culturally and socially for it, it seems to me, too. This lack of respect for people and institutions is worrisome. It is doubly worrisome in our schools.

Teachers can’t teach, and children cannot learn if the classroom is in chaos. I know that teachers sometimes possess poor classroom management techniques. It is easy to distinguish the ones who do from the ones who don’t. Stand outside any classroom. Tell-tell signs include yelling, threatening, and a general impression of disorder.

Even the best teachers have trouble with classroom behavior these days, though. I had dinner with a colleague recently. She may be one of the best teachers I have ever known. She shared that she had just had the “worst day of her entire career.”

Pupils running wild in classroom at the elementary school

She had subbed that day. The 3rd graders to whom she had been assigned didn’t have a routine yet–and it was mid-March. She knew she was in for a bad day by 8:30 that morning. She made it through the full day but swore she would never go back to that school or that classroom.

One has to wonder, though. Is the problem with the teacher alone? Or is part of the problem that children are no longer taught to respect the adult in the room anymore? Do they respect their parents? Do they respect anything or anyone?

What I know for sure is that there is a price to pay for not having children respect teachers. In fact, teaching as a profession already feels outdated. It is fast becoming “just a job.”

I am concerned that classrooms of the future are going to run by people who in it for the short term. Teaching will be seen as a temp job until they decide to go back to law school or start a family or start their own business.

I dread that day, but I have to admit, I see it coming. As respect diminishes for teachers and the profession, I see it coming faster and faster.

Until next time.

Photos by Depositphotos.com

4 Critical Mistakes that Hold Most Teachers Back From Finding a New Career Path

I have thought a lot about what teachers who want to make a career change should do to successfully change careers. The longer you have taught, the more difficult the transition may be. You need to understand the moving parts of the job search process if you want to be successful. You also need to appreciate how a future employer might see you as a potential candidate.
Success scheme on notepad

Success

Watch a video I recorded on this topic by clicking here.
 In a nutshell, here are the 4 mistakes teachers make:
1. Not spending enough time with the question, what do you want to do next? Few teachers–few job seekers in general, actually–spend as much time on this question as it deserves. Changing course mid-career can feel daunting. It takes time. You need to take the time to consider your purpose and your passion. Consider what you feel is your mission in life is. Take time to complete some aptitude assessments. Find free and inexpensive aptitude tests online. Check your Myers-Briggs profile. Revisit it if you haven’t thought about your natural dispositions lately. Shouldn’t your career be in alignment with what you enjoy doing? And shouldn’t your work duties be things that come to you naturally? Why do so many people work in jobs where they feel like they are “swimming upstream” much of the time? Also, consider your core values. Your next career should also be in alignment with your deeply held beliefs.
2.  Rushing into writing a resume or worse, paying someone else to do it for you. You can’t write a resume until you have gained clarity around the question of what is next for you. People think that their resume is a chronicle of their complete work history. Many teacher resumes include lists of duties and responsibilities. They should focus on achievements and successes instead. I also see many resumes that fail to make the connection to the job description at hand. Your resume should be a good match with the job description if you are going to apply. I heard one recruiter say that the resume must be at least a 60% to 70% match.

Unemployment.

3. Applying for anything and everything that you think you might like to do or CAN do. Too many teachers either undervalue or overvalue their transferrable skills. For example, teachers often tell me that they are considering corporate training. That seems to be a good segue from teaching. The trouble is that there is a big difference between teaching 2nd-graders and adults. There is even a big difference between teaching high school kids and adults! Most hiring managers will be leery of hiring anyone without direct training experience. If you would like to be a trainer, make sure to offer some training as a volunteer if you need to. Gain some real-world experience to include on the resume. Taking that initiative signals that you have already branched out into that area. Your success there might predict your future success in a training job. The best approach to changing careers is a strategic one. Think through what it is you want in the future and work your way backward to where you are now. What logical steps should you take to get you to where you want to be? Think of it as a chess game. You need to understand the rules of the game to win.

4. Not understanding how important LinkedIn is to your job search. LinkedIn is currently growing at the rate of 2 new members per second. Headhunters, recruiters, and hiring managers look for talent there. They prefer passive talent–those who are not searching for a job–to active job seekers. If you can build a rock star LinkedIn profile, you move a step closer to finding the job of your dreams. Frame your profile around what it is you want to do next (see #1). Keep the focus more future oriented than past oriented. Highlight your transferable skills rather than on duties and responsibilities. Make sure your photo is professional looking, and don’t forget to customize your URL. Build connections with colleagues as quickly as possible. Get to the 501 mark. Connect with alumni and friends from your personal circle. Look for people that you know who work for companies that you think you might like to work for in the future. You may wind up using LinkedIn connections to get your resume in front of the right people.

These are 4 of the critical mistakes I see teachers making when they want to change their career. Learn more about how to avoid costly mistakes that job seekers make. Register for my FREE webinar here: http://bit.ly/JumpstartYourJobSearchWebinar. You will learn 10 things you should know about job hunting or changing careers.
Top view of the working place with woman's hands. A laptop, notepad and a cup of coffee are on the table. A job search flowchart is drawn on the table.
Job Search
Join me May 2, 2017, at 7 pm Eastern. To register, click here: http://bit.ly/JumpstartYourJobSearchWebinar.
Until next time.

“What’s the #1 Thing Anyone Considering a Career Change Should Do First?

 

Are you stuck, bored, or burned out in a career that you no longer love? If so, the #1 thing you must do first is to decide what do you want to do next.
Sounds easy, doesn’t it? Just decide. Unfortunately, it isn’t easy at all. And the stakes couldn’t be higher! We’re talking about your life, after all.
When I faced my own career crossroads a few years ago, I was stumped. I had no idea what I wanted to do next. I had reached the highest point that I could go in my previous job. (I served as President of the Virginia Education Association from 2008-2012.) I had earned a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership in 2007, but I had never been an administrator..nor did I want to be.
I have two Masters’ degrees, but neither of them offered a prospective job possibility
I also had 33 years experience as an educator. But I was too tired to return to the classroom.
That meant a career change for me. But what to do? Where to go?
I certainly had not planned to retire so early. When you cry every time you consider a prospective idea, however, I think that is a clear sign that you need to think of something else. That’s where I was. Every time I thought about going back to the classroom, I teared up and experienced a profound sense of dread. I was just too tired.
I eventually decided to take early retirement and take some much needed time to rest up. I thought I would feel better if I could take some time for myself. And the rest was wonderful. But I didn’t help me make a decision around the future of my career.

 

I stayed stuck for months. I tried to write my own resume, but I didn’t know what I was doing. I hired a professional resume writer but was unhappy with the results and felt like I had wasted $400.
I finally found a career coach who offered online advice for a reasonable price. I took her online course which opened my eyes to all the mistakes I had made so far in my search.
Here is the thing about job searching. You don’t know what you don’t know, and what you don’t know, in this case, can hurt you. There is an old saying that “What you don’t know cannot hurt you.” In job hunting, what you don’t know will hurt you. In this case, ignorance is NOT bliss.

I made the same mistake that a lot of job seekers make when they start out to change their job or career. They write their resume first based on all the things they have ever done since they started to work. They include everything because they want to display all their experience whether it is relevant or not.
That approach might have worked in years past. Today, recruiters and hiring managers are not interested everything you have ever done. They want to see what can you do for them NOW. They care about your unique blend of skills, experience, education, talents, and aptitudes. They want to know how you can help them solve their current and future problems. How can you save them money or make them more money? They are much more interested in the bottom line. What can you bring to them? And how well will you fit in with their team?
You can’t write a resume that conveys your value until you decide what it is you bring to the prospective job. And you can’t decide that until you have decided what the heck you want to do with your career? You have to answer the question, “What do you want to do next?” You may be crystal clear on all that you don’t want to do, but the clarity needs to be around what you want in the next phase of your career.
Here was my list of wants:  I wanted a flexible schedule. I wanted to work for myself instead of someone else. I preferred to work from home. I wanted to work in a way that provided service to people. I also wanted to stay in touch with my teacher colleagues because I know teachers. I love teachers. I understand teachers because I have walked in their shoes.
What resulted from that list of wants was the idea of coaching, but I resisted that idea for months. I didn’t believe that coaching was a real “job.” I didn’t believe I could make any money coaching. I didn’t believe I could support myself as a coach. I was afraid that I would never convince anyone that I had anything of value to offer.
Yet, the idea would not go away, and at the end of the day, I had all those “wants” that fit the profile of coaching.
I talked to my coach about it after I heard a presentation on the topic of “Follow Your Passion…Find Your Next Job.” I decided to try on the idea of coaching, at least. So, I asked her what she thought. Her response was perfect. “If you feel called to coach teachers who are feeling the kind of burnout you have been feeling, you should go for it.” That was all the encouragement I needed.
I started to look into coaching programs. I learned that coaching is one of the fastest growing industries, and it has not leveled off yet. Many Boomers are turning to coaching. They want to help their younger colleagues with some of the challenges they face. After all, Boomers have a lot of experience and expertise to offer.
So, it turned out that coaching was next for ME.
The question is, what is next for YOU?

If you don’t know what you want to do next or what your next steps are, then I encourage you to find someone who can help you figure it out sooner rather than later. You will waste valuable time and money if you fail to answer the simple, yet not so easy question, “What do you want to do next?”
You can’t ignore the question. In fact, your life depends upon your being able to answer it.
Until next time.
Photos by Depositphotos.com.

 

 

What Do You Want to Do Next?

People often ask me, “What’s the #1 thing you would say about getting started with a new job search?”

My answer is almost always to ask in return, “What do you want to do next in your career?” It’s shocking how few people can answer that simple question. In fact, in my experience, only two in a hundred can tell me without hesitation what they want to do next in their lives.

Now What Way to Go the Way Forward Ahead Concept

They are quick to tell me what they don’t want to do…but few people even let themselves consider what they want. Instead, they focus on what they think they can do or what they believe they can have.

I say, get rid of that limiting thinking!

If you are at a career crossroads, it is time to let yourself dream of possibilities! Don’t let anything keep you from considering what you want. Likewise, don’t think of settling for what you think you can have or worse, what you might deserve.

I encourage my clients to forget about the “how” of what they want for the time being. Don’t worry about how to make it happen even if you want something that sounds outrageous. Becoming a coach to teachers suffering from burnout sounded outrageous to me a few years ago. At the end of a lot of soul searching, however, I decided that was exactly what I wanted to do. Once I got past worrying about “how” I just started doing it, and I am still going strong.

Inspirational and Motivational Typographic Quote Vector Poster Design. All limitations are self imposed. Vector Typographic Background Design

 

Since making that decision, I have helped dozens of teachers examine their possibilities. I encourage them to consider what they want to do instead of teaching. Many of them are still working on making their transition from teaching happen. They are developing a working plan, however, with my help.
 
That’s where the “Jumpstart Your Job Search Program” comes in so handy. It guides you through the job search process starting with how to answer the question, “What do you want to do next?” With my help, you learn how to answer that question. Then you learn how to tackle the moving parts of the job search process with greater ease and confidence.
 

 

Top view of the working place with woman's hands. A laptop, notepad and a cup of coffee are on the table. A job search flowchart is drawn on the table.

So, let me ask you. What do YOU want to do next?
 
If you are ready to explore that question in earnest, then take a look at the Jumpstart Your Job Search Program.” Let’s get you started on what is next for YOU!

 

Stress Management Tools for Teachers: 7 Tips for Surviving the Rest of This Year

Spring has sprung, April is upon us as we are already a week in. Easter is a week away, and for many teachers and students around the country, that means a much needed and well-deserved Spring Break.

Once Spring Break is over, everyone comes back to school with a single purpose in mind:  get through the last weeks of school as quickly as possible. I have written before about how some teachers and students begin a countdown until the end of the school year, checking off each day as one day closer to “freedom.”

counting the days

The hard fact is that teaching is an increasingly stressful occupation. I receive calls every day from teachers all over the country who confess with some chagrin and no small amount of regret that they are experiencing symptoms of burnout. They need to escape, and while I can help in that area, the more immediate concern is what to do about the stress until they can make their getaway?

Unchecked and uncontrolled stress will make you sick!

Because I want to help, I have developed a short course on how to keep your sanity and navigate these final weeks of school with some sense of peace and ease.

Want to know more?

Take a look at this video, and I will explain.

In this short course, I cover 7 specific strategies designed to help you manage your stress more effectively…not just during these final weeks of school, but all the time. The strategies are:

  1. Mindset (Attitude)
  2. Healthy habits (staying physically strong and well)
  3. Controlling your environment
  4. Managing your workload more effectively
  5. Using the 5-Second Rule (thank you Mel Robbins!)
  6. Setting better boundaries
  7. Asking for help when you need it

Each module in the short course includes information and instruction along with recommendations and suggested resources selected to help you implement the strategy for the week.

Each module is designed to help highlight areas where teachers, in particular, tend to fall into certain traps.

For example, get a group of teachers together and listen to their conversation. I can guarantee that in less than five minutes, the complaining will start. Not that the complaints aren’t legitimate because I would venture to guess that they probably are. The trouble is that complaining without doing something about the object of the complaint is not only not helpful, but it can also become counterproductive.

I hope you have new complaints

The trouble with complaining with a friend about things at work is that it validates your perception of reality, and if you feel aggrieved, it adds to your sense of righteous indignation. Venting can be healthy, but too often, complaints devolve into gossip which can be dangerous and even more counterproductive.

Don’t get me wrong. I am not above gossiping. (I am human, after all.)

I was especially guilty of it when I was teaching, however. The lounge invited gossip of all stripes. Gossip about students, their parents, the principal, and anyone who happened to be out of the room at the time.

Here’s the thing about gossip. While it can seem harmless enough, sometimes, it becomes harmful. Especially if it turns out to be wrong or untruthful, it can certainly hurt the person who is the object of the gossip.

Gossip seems to be built into our DNA. I don’t know anyone who is above engaging in it although my grandmother was pretty good about avoiding it. In fact, I never heard her say a single negative thing about anyone. She would listen silently to a conversation about someone in the community or at church, and invariably, if she did speak, it was to offer something positive about the person in question. But she was the rare exception.

In fact, if you think about it, we thrive on gossip, don’t we? Why is the National Enquirer so popular except that people love the juicy headlines on the cover each week. Even if you don’t buy it, you take a look at the cover as you wait in line at the grocery store, don’t you? Magazines like People and others thrive on gossip about celebrities, and we are eager to hear all the details.

Too often, teachers thrive on gossip about each other. And it is hurtful to the culture of the school in general.

Women gossiping.

I would like to suggest that one way to better manage your stress between now and the end of the year is to become mindful of your own habit as it relates to gossip…even gossip that seems harmless.

You see, it is not just an empty phrase that mindset is critical to your success or that attitude is everything.

Your attitude creates the frame through which you view your life. If you are constantly on the hunt for something that you can criticize or complain about, you will find plenty of things about which to complain and criticize and you will be extremely unhappy with your life.

During these last few weeks of school, strive to find positive things to say, and look for the positive in each situation that arises. It may feel hard at first. But it will become easier with practice. Changing the way you view things can make a huge difference in your attitude, and once your attitude changes, everything around you changes…like magic.

If you would like to know more about how to manage these final weeks of school with ease, click here and learn more about the program I am offering. It is a great deal as far as your investment of time and money, and it may make a huge difference in how you wind up this school year.

Happy Spring!

 

It’s TESTING TIME for Teachers and Students

If you are a teacher, you are probably already feeling the pressure of testing time, and it isn’t even April! I have started getting messages from teachers who are too busy to think about what they might want to do next year career-wise. They are in simple survival mode.

And I get it.

During my last 20 years of serving as a library media specialist at the elementary school level, I served two schools. The first school struggled for the first year or two after testing mania took hold in Virginia, but once we figured out what we needed to do and we actually had a curriculum to follow, we got accredited and it was fairly smooth sailing each year. Teachers were concerned, of course, and the spring drill began there just like it does most other places, but nobody was losing sleep worrying about whether the school would meet accreditation standards.

That changed when I changed schools in 2001. I moved from a fairly affluent suburban community to a Title I school with a majority minority population. The year I arrived was the year after the school had finally reached accreditation status after years of being on the state department’s list of “failing schools.”

The photo below sums up how most of my colleagues felt for half of the school year.Business man in office with burnout syndrome at desk

In fact, I recall the tension beginning to build as early as February…months before the tests were to be administered. The climate on our campus changed dramatically. You could feel the tension as though it were a palpable substance. Teachers worried…would they be able to get their kids through this year or would we go back to being blacklisted by the state?

I was there for eight years, and that anxiety from February through June never stopped. Each year, teachers and administrators brainstormed new ways of trying to drill the standards into the children so they would pass the standardized tests.

I wasn’t a classroom teacher, so during each spring testing season, I was called upon to proctor. It always made me sad. I watched the teachers fret and the children struggle. The students all knew on some level that the stakes were high. They tried very hard. And each year, from 2001 until I left in 2008, they managed to pass, but that never alleviated the concern that they might not.

This is the time when stress really ramps up for teachers. They begin to lose sleep, staying up late making lesson plans or grading papers, or brainstorming ways to get their kids to understand better what they need to know for the tests.

They begin to eat more because they are stressed out. They begin to forget about exercise. Who has time? They start to gain weight but are too busy to do anything about it.

They leave off getting together with friends for the same reason. They are just too busy and preoccupied to be very sociable.

I get it. I’ve lived it. But here is what I know for sure. Taking on the weight of the world during this season will maybe mean the difference of a point or two on a student’s test, but it could ultimately make you sick.

Stress gone unchecked can raise your blood pressure, cause early onset diabetes, bring on heart attacks, and gastrointestinal issues.

This is the time of year when you need to take better care of yourself. It is more important now than ever!

Download my FREE eBook, Stressed, Stretched, and Just Plain Overwhelmed:  a Guide to Managing Your Stress and Creating a Greater Sense of Work-Life Balance. 

I can’t guarantee that you will feel as stress-free as this woman:  

stressfreewoman

But I can guarantee that you will learn some strategies that may help you cope more effectively during these last few months of school.

I also invite you to attend a live, FREE workshop entitled, “Stress Management Tools for Teachers.” 

To register, click here.

During this 60-minute class, you will learn more about the seven specific strategies that I recommend for you in the book. These are strategies for you to practice not just during the spring testing season, but all year long. You need to take care of your health! If you wind up sick, what happens to how your students prep for their big tests that are coming up?

Don’t let the testing season bring you down! “Do your best and forget the rest” as Tony Horton says. You need to be present for your spouse and your own children, after all. Heck, your students will be negatively affected if you are stressed out and cranky because you feel overwhelmed with work responsibilities.

So what do you say? First download the free eBook here.  Report cover Final (1)

Then sign up for the workshop, “Stress Management Tools for Teachers” here or click the button below.

Big red sign up now button

Photos by Shutterstock.

Until next time.

 

 

 

[Case Study] Learn How Richard Benefitted from Having Kitty Serve as a Sounding Board

Not everyone feels comfortable being in front of a camera, so for this case study, Richard has offered written answers to questions that I asked him about the work we did together as we considered the possibility of a new career path. He was experiencing symptoms of teacher burnout when he reached out to me a few months ago. Find answers to questions I asked him as we approached the end of our work together about the benefit of the work we did. He hasn’t yet made his transition out of teaching, but he is definitely moving in the right direction.

(Question) What particular challenge were you dealing with that led you to enroll with me to help with your job search?

(Richard) I have been a teacher for decades, and I was discovering that it was getting harder and harder to get my work done. I actually never believed in burnout, but in talking with Kitty and some others, I started to believe that burnout might, in fact have been the problem. A very long commute and having two small children drained all the enthusiasm and efficiency that I long had for my work. I simply started noticed that I was constantly fatigued and irritable. Furthermore, the school I worked at decided to grow class sizes and increase workload, despite many teachers there already putting in a good 60 hours a week. This kind of life for me started to become unsustainable. I found it hard to be an energetic teacher going at a full sprint for ten months a year. I’ve heard that many people switch careers several times in their lifetimes, but I never thought I would be one of them. So, I contacted Kitty, who specialized in working with teachers, to see what my options were.

Furthermore, the school I worked at decided to grow class sizes and increase workload, despite many teachers there already putting in a good 60 hours a week. This kind of life for me started to become unsustainable. I found it hard to be an energetic teacher going at a full sprint for ten months a year. I’ve heard that many people switch careers several times in their lifetimes, but I never thought I would be one of them. So, I contacted Kitty, who specialized in working with teachers, to see what my options were.

(Question) What was an answer, instruction, or inspiration you discovered that started to turn things around?

 (Richard) I spent most of my time working with Kitty on what might be realistic options for a new career. I started out taking an inventory of myself including my interests, skills, passions, wishes. Kitty’s course has several lengthy questionnaires, which took some time answering but were well worth the effort. Some of what Kitty noticed I already knew about myself.

My fascination with “big picture questions,” for example. Learning that she saw the same things in myself was encouraging for me. It gave me the confidence I needed to look into certain types of fields and not others. Indeed, Kitty provided a wealth of books and internet resources to help my self-exploration. It helped me really start to look hard at what I loved about teaching (and would want to keep in a future career) as well as what I disliked about the profession (and would want to avoid in a new career).

The most exciting thing that I discovered was my interest in questions of meaning and purpose. This led us to discuss the possibility of entering a ministry or chaplaincy. I had long considered this possibility, but what I think I needed to hear was someone else tell me that this really could be something that I did with my life. It wasn’t a “pipe-dream” or a pure fantasy. This led me to look into theology programs, including secular and Buddhist mindfulness training programs. The idea that there were other things I could do actually made my current job a little easier for me too. I felt far less trapped. I think Kitty’s encouragement was invaluable for me to consider that I was freer and more in control of what I did with my life than I was feeling after teaching for so long.

(Question) What were your specific results? (i.e., How is your life, job, career different now because of what you learned and implemented?)

(Richard) I am presently still teaching, but what has been exciting for me is that, once I started to consider a more religious profession, more doors for such a career started to open up for me. I am currently apprenticing with a mindfulness teacher, and I will begin a year-long training and certification program in June to become a mindfulness teacher for adolescents and children. I feel particularly called to this task since I have found that the stresses I experience in my job are equally shared by my students and their parents. I would like to help them all cope better with the pressures that are imposed on us. I don’t know yet what this means for earning a living, but I am excited by the prospect.

(Question)  What were other benefits you experienced from your work with me? (e.g. financial, emotional, physical, or spiritual)

(Richard) I think what I most valued from our conversation was Kitty’s encouragement and positive attitude about making changes in my life. Sometimes, for whatever reason, it helps to hear someone give you “permission” to move on, to try something new, to follow your passion or your dream. I think I was waiting for an invitation to make a change and that doing so was what was needed in my life. Such a change, though, is scary, as one is making a leap or taking a risk.

There is no guarantee my plans will ultimately work out, but I was encouraged by all the examples that Kitty shared with me of people who did take the leap and did land safely on the other side. Kitty often said to me that if we can be clear in what we want, the universe will open up opportunities for us. I think this is true insofar as, by making a commitment to investigate a new path for myself, I became aware of a lot of opportunities that were right there in front of me but that I wouldn’t I have noticed had Kitty not encouraged me to look for them. I am grateful for her guidance and encouragement throughout our time working together.

(Question) Would you recommend me as a coach to friends & colleagues? If so, why?

(Richard) Yes, I would recommend Kitty as a coach, especially to those who feel burnt out and stuck in teaching. Teaching is a harder job than I think many realize, especially if one is a committed teacher. Kitty worked for years in education, and she understands what burnout looks like and how to move past it. I found her to possess a wealth of resources – from books to internet sites and businesses to innovators and entrepreneurs in a variety of fields. I would often take note of all these resources to track them down once our conversations were over, and I always found them helpful for giving me new ideas on how to look at my own situation and how to build a new career for myself. I also found Kitty to be extremely encouraging and positive about making good changes in our lives. I found our time working together invaluable, and I would recommend her with great enthusiasm.